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Turkey warns 'fascist' Holland will 'pay a price'





Turkey warns 'fascist' Holland will 'pay a price' Turkey warns 'fascist' Holland will 'pay a price'
  • Two Turkish ministers were banned from entering the Netherlands by authorities
  • Erdogan then accused the Dutch of Nazism and being 'the capital of fascism'
  • Turkish nationals in Rotterdam became embroiled in violent clashes in the street
  • Dogs and horses were unleashed as riots ensued outside the Turkish consulate 

Turkey's President Tayyip Erdogan has labelled Holland a fascist nation and as said the country will pay for blocking election rallies in Rotterdam and the ensuing riots.

Ugly scenes erupted in the city as dogs were unleashed on Turkish nationals amid protests over two ministers being blocked from entering the Netherlands

Erdogan repeated hugely controversial accusations that the Netherlands - occupied by Germany in World War II - was behaving like Nazis and fascists in its treatment of his officials.

A Dutch riot policeman tries to get his dog to let go of a man after riots broke out during a pro Erdogan demonstration at the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam, Netherlands A Dutch riot policeman tries to get his dog to let go of a man after riots broke out during a pro Erdogan demonstration at the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam, Netherlands

A Dutch riot policeman tries to get his dog to let go of a man after riots broke out during a pro Erdogan demonstration at the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam, Netherlands

Screaming men face off with Dutch riot police outside the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam Screaming men face off with Dutch riot police outside the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam

Screaming men face off with Dutch riot police outside the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam

A man prepares to launch a metal railing at as demonstrators and riot police clash in Rotterdam A man prepares to launch a metal railing at as demonstrators and riot police clash in Rotterdam

A man prepares to launch a metal railing at as demonstrators and riot police clash in Rotterdam

Mr Erdogan addresses his supporters in Istanbul after the Dutch government withdrew landing permission for the Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu's aircraft Mr Erdogan addresses his supporters in Istanbul after the Dutch government withdrew landing permission for the Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu's aircraft

Mr Erdogan addresses his supporters in Istanbul after the Dutch government withdrew landing permission for the Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu's aircraft

A line of riot police advance towards demonstrators as violent clashes erupted in the Netherlands A line of riot police advance towards demonstrators as violent clashes erupted in the Netherlands

A line of riot police advance towards demonstrators as violent clashes erupted in the Netherlands

Analysts are predicting a tight outcome to the April 16 referendum on a new constitution and Turkish ministers have planned major rallies in key EU cities to win votes from millions of Turks residing abroad.

But Turkey's Family Minister Fatma Betul Sayan Kaya was expelled after being prevented from addressing a rally in the Dutch port city of Rotterdam.

Also this weekend, The Hague refused to allow Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu's plane to land ahead of a planned rally. 

Violent clashes between protesters and Dutch riot police officers turned ugly quickly as 1,000 people turned up to voice their disapproval of the ministers' access to the country being blocked. 

 

Some men were seen throwing stones, others were seen kicking police officers who had fallen to the ground and metal railings were also hurled in the riots.  

'Hey Holland! If you are sacrificing Turkish-Dutch relations for the sake of the elections on Wednesday, you will pay a price,' an angry Erdogan told a ceremony in Istanbul, referring to the March 15 election in Turkey's NATO ally.

'They will learn what diplomacy is,' he said, adding that what happened 'cannot remain unanswered'.

'If you let horses, dogs on my citizens you have to be held to account,' he said, referring to dogs, horses and water cannons used by Dutch police to disperse pro-Erdogan demonstrators after clashes in Rotterdam early Sunday.

If you let horses, dogs on my citizens you have to be held to account 
Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan 

But Dutch Prime Prime Minister Mark Rutte ruled out apologising, and said: 'There's absolutely no way excuses can be made, they should make excuses for what they've done yesterday.'

Erdogan repeated his accusations that the Dutch response to the Turkish visits was 'Nazism, fascism'.

Speaking at a rally in the French city of Metz - which was allowed to go ahead - Cavusoglu described the Netherlands as the 'capital of fascism'.

The Netherlands is home to some 400,000 people of Turkish origin while Germany has 1.4 million people eligible to vote in Turkey - the fourth-largest electoral base after the cities of Istanbul, Ankara and Izmir. 

A well-dressed man in a suit cowers as a man in dark clothing kicks a riot police officer on the ground A well-dressed man in a suit cowers as a man in dark clothing kicks a riot police officer on the ground

A well-dressed man in a suit cowers as a man in dark clothing kicks a riot police officer on the ground

A man in a suit and a riot police officer come together as another officer falls to the ground A man in a suit and a riot police officer come together as another officer falls to the ground

A man in a suit and a riot police officer come together as another officer falls to the ground

Faced with an upsurge in support for the far-right, European governments have come under pressure to take a hard line on Erdogan, who is accused by critics of seeking one-man rule in the constitutional changes.

Danish Prime Minister Lars Lokke on Sunday called on his Turkish counterpart Binali Yildirim to delay a planned March visit because of the 'tensions'.

Police clashed with pro-Erdogan demonstrators in the Netherlands overnight while in Istanbul on Sunday a man climbed onto the roof of the Dutch consulate and replaced the Dutch flag with a Turkish flag.

A Dutch foreign ministry spokeswoman said the Netherlands had 'protested to the Turkish authorities' over the incident.

The latest row came after NATO allies Turkey and Germany sparred over the cancellation of a series of referendum campaign events there.

German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere said Sunday he was against Turkish ministers holding political rallies in Germany.

'A Turkish campaign has no business being here in Germany,' he told public broadcaster ARD.

Separately, German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said he hoped Turkey 'would return to its senses'.

Berlin has also emerged as a strident critic over Ankara's crackdown following an attempted coup, which has seen more than 100,000 people arrested or dismissed from their posts over alleged links to the plotters or to Kurdish militants.

'The West has clearly shown its true face in the last couple of days,' Erdogan said.

'What we have seen is a clear manifestation of Islamophobia,' he added.

The president indicated that he himself plans to travel to Europe for rallies, a move that could potentially create an even greater row. 

Recep Tayyip Erdogan's remarks about the Dutch being 'Nazi remnants' were made at a rally in Istanbul, as he currently hopes to secure a 'Yes' vote in a referendum over whether he be granted increased powers Recep Tayyip Erdogan's remarks about the Dutch being 'Nazi remnants' were made at a rally in Istanbul, as he currently hopes to secure a 'Yes' vote in a referendum over whether he be granted increased powers

Recep Tayyip Erdogan's remarks about the Dutch being 'Nazi remnants' were made at a rally in Istanbul, as he currently hopes to secure a 'Yes' vote in a referendum over whether he be granted increased powers

Dutch riot police battle pro Erdogan demonstrators after riots broke out at the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam Dutch riot police battle pro Erdogan demonstrators after riots broke out at the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam

Dutch riot police battle pro Erdogan demonstrators after riots broke out at the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam

A demonstrator aims a boot at a Dutch riot police officer who has fallen to the ground A demonstrator aims a boot at a Dutch riot police officer who has fallen to the ground

A demonstrator aims a boot at a Dutch riot police officer who has fallen to the ground

A demonstrator with his arms behind his back screams as he is surrounded by three policemen A demonstrator with his arms behind his back screams as he is surrounded by three policemen

A demonstrator with his arms behind his back screams as he is surrounded by three policemen

demonstrator throws a stone during clashes with riot police in the streets near the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam demonstrator throws a stone during clashes with riot police in the streets near the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam

demonstrator throws a stone during clashes with riot police in the streets near the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam

Turkish residents of the Netherlands gather for a protest in Rotterdam on March 11, 2017 Turkish residents of the Netherlands gather for a protest in Rotterdam on March 11, 2017

Turkish residents of the Netherlands gather for a protest in Rotterdam on March 11, 2017

Turkey's family affairs minister, Fatma Betul Sayan Kaya, also blocked by Dutch police from entering the consulate

Turkish family affairs minister, Fatma Betul Sayan Kaya (pictured), was also denied entry into Holland, according to reports Turkish family affairs minister, Fatma Betul Sayan Kaya (pictured), was also denied entry into Holland, according to reports

Turkish family affairs minister, Fatma Betul Sayan Kaya (pictured), was also denied entry into Holland, according to reports

Turkey's family affairs minister says Dutch authorities escorted her to the border with Germany in a manner that 'tramples on all democratic and human values.'

Fatma Betul Sayan Kaya said through her twitter account that she was being taken to the town of Nijmegen, near the border with Germany, adding that she condemned the Dutch authorities' action in 'the name of all of our citizens.'

Kaya wrote: 'The whole world must take action against this fascist practice! Such a treatment against a woman minister cannot be accepted.'

As demonstrations in Rotterdam grew, police moved in to disperse protestors using water cannon and horses to break up protests.

After several hours of a calm, but tense demonstration involving more than 1,000 people outside the Turkish consulate, police were seen - some carrying out mounted charges on horseback -  beginning to forcefully disperse the protestors.

The port city's mayor Ahmed Aboutaleb told reporters police had moved in to try to break up 'a few groups', but that the situation in the city centre was stabilising as police 'try to get everyone to return home.'

But after initially dispersing, the crowd began to gather in smaller groups again, with the police once again moving in, a source said.

Fatma Betul Sayan Kaya had crossed into Holland several hours earlier aiming to attend a rally in support of the Turkish government's planned April referendum, despite angry Dutch pleas to Ankara to keep its ministers away.

Earlier Dutch authorities had also refused Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu permission to land in the city for a rally to gather support for a referendum on boosting the presidential powers. 

The vote on whether Mr Erdogan should be given more power (his supporters are pictured here) is a potentially divisive issue in Turkey, and Rotterdam authorities said on Friday they was banning the rally The vote on whether Mr Erdogan should be given more power (his supporters are pictured here) is a potentially divisive issue in Turkey, and Rotterdam authorities said on Friday they was banning the rally

The vote on whether Mr Erdogan should be given more power (his supporters are pictured here) is a potentially divisive issue in Turkey, and Rotterdam authorities said on Friday they was banning the rally

The nation will go to the polls on April 16 to decide whether the president's powers should be increased The nation will go to the polls on April 16 to decide whether the president's powers should be increased

The nation will go to the polls on April 16 to decide whether the president's powers should be increased

Supporters of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan at the opening ceremony of the Bagcilar district subway station in Istanbul Supporters of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan at the opening ceremony of the Bagcilar district subway station in Istanbul

Supporters of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan at the opening ceremony of the Bagcilar district subway station in Istanbul

Recep Tayyip Erdogan's remarks were made at a rally in Istanbul, as he currently hopes to secure a 'Yes' vote in a referendum over whether he be granted greater powers.

He is targeting expat voters in European countries with high Turkish populations, such as the Netherlands and Germany. 

Mr Erdogan told the crowd back in Turkey earlier in the day: 'You can stop our foreign minister's plane all you want, let's see how your planes will come to Turkey from now on,' Mr Erdogan told booing crowds.

'They do not know politics or international diplomacy…these Nazi remnants, they are fascists.' 

Turkish foreign minister Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu believes he should be able to fly 'wherever I want' Turkish foreign minister Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu believes he should be able to fly 'wherever I want'
Mark Rutte said Turkey was not respecting the rules relating to public gatherings Mark Rutte said Turkey was not respecting the rules relating to public gatherings

Turkish foreign minister Mevlut Cavusoglu (left) believes he should be able to fly 'wherever I want'. Dutch prime minister. Dutch prime minister Mark Rutte (right) said Turkey was not respecting the rules relating to public gatherings

A spokesman for the Dutch government said: 'Many Dutch people with a Turkish background are authorised to vote in the referendum over the Turkish constitution,' A spokesman for the Dutch government said: 'Many Dutch people with a Turkish background are authorised to vote in the referendum over the Turkish constitution,'

A spokesman for the Dutch government said: 'Many Dutch people with a Turkish background are authorised to vote in the referendum over the Turkish constitution,'

'These gatherings are not allowed to contribute to tensions in our society and everyone who wants to hold a gathering is obliged to follow instructions of those in authority, so that public order and safety can be guaranteed.' the spokesman added 'These gatherings are not allowed to contribute to tensions in our society and everyone who wants to hold a gathering is obliged to follow instructions of those in authority, so that public order and safety can be guaranteed.' the spokesman added

'These gatherings are not allowed to contribute to tensions in our society and everyone who wants to hold a gathering is obliged to follow instructions of those in authority, so that public order and safety can be guaranteed.' the spokesman added

Demonstrators took to the consulate in Rotterdam, Netherlands to wave flags and protest Demonstrators took to the consulate in Rotterdam, Netherlands to wave flags and protest

Demonstrators took to the consulate in Rotterdam, Netherlands to wave flags and protest

Members of the police stand in line during a gathering of several hundred demonstrators waving Turkish flags outside the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam Members of the police stand in line during a gathering of several hundred demonstrators waving Turkish flags outside the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam

Members of the police stand in line during a gathering of several hundred demonstrators waving Turkish flags outside the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam

The protesters were demanding to see the Turkish Family Minister Fatma Betul Sayan Kaya who was barred by police and escorted to the German border The protesters were demanding to see the Turkish Family Minister Fatma Betul Sayan Kaya who was barred by police and escorted to the German border

The protesters were demanding to see the Turkish Family Minister Fatma Betul Sayan Kaya who was barred by police and escorted to the German border

Earlier in the day, Dutch government denied landing rights to Turkish Foreign Minister Cavusoglu who planned a speech at the consul's residence in Rotterdam Earlier in the day, Dutch government denied landing rights to Turkish Foreign Minister Cavusoglu who planned a speech at the consul's residence in Rotterdam

Earlier in the day, Dutch government denied landing rights to Turkish Foreign Minister Cavusoglu who planned a speech at the consul's residence in Rotterdam

Hundreds of protesters gathered near the Dutch Embassy in the Turkish capital in Ankara shouting slogans against the Netherlands for barring Turkish ministers from addressing rallies there Hundreds of protesters gathered near the Dutch Embassy in the Turkish capital in Ankara shouting slogans against the Netherlands for barring Turkish ministers from addressing rallies there
State-run television said some protesters hurled eggs toward the Dutch embassy but were warned to keep the protest peaceful State-run television said some protesters hurled eggs toward the Dutch embassy but were warned to keep the protest peaceful

State-run television said some protesters hurled eggs toward the Dutch embassy but were warned to keep the protest peaceful

Police sealed off the entrance to Holland Street, where the embassy is located. Around 500 people were seen waving Turkish and Ottoman flags near the embassy building Police sealed off the entrance to Holland Street, where the embassy is located. Around 500 people were seen waving Turkish and Ottoman flags near the embassy building

Police sealed off the entrance to Holland Street, where the embassy is located. Around 500 people were seen waving Turkish and Ottoman flags near the embassy building

Dutch prime minister Mark Rutte said that while the Netherlands and Turkey could search for 'an acceptable solution', Turkey was not respecting the rules relating to public gatherings. 

A spokesman for the Dutch government added: 'Many Dutch people with a Turkish background are authorised to vote in the referendum over the Turkish constitution,' it said.

'The Dutch government does not have any opposition to gatherings in our country to inform them about it.

 

 

 

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